Twacha Aesthetic Clinic

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Skin Tags Removal

Anywhere on the body, a skin tag is a hanging skin that is frequently attached by a tiny stalk. It is prevalent in both men and women, is non-cancerous, and causes no pain. Skin creases are frequently the location of skin tags. After the age of 50, skin tags appear quite frequently.

What causes skin tags ?

  • It’s still unclear what caused the skin tag exactly. Since friction frequently manifests as skin wrinkles, that may be the cause.
  • Skin tags are another typical pregnancy side effect, and they often go away after the baby is born. The abrupt weight increase and pregnant hormones may be to blame for this. Multiple skin tags may occasionally signify hormonal imbalance.
  • There might be a genetic link.
  • Both men and women can develop skin tags, and those with Type 2 diabetes as well as those who are older are more likely to do so.

Who has a higher risk of getting skin tags?

Skin tags seem to be more common in:

  • Extremely fatty and obese individuals.
  • Those who suffer from diabetes and cardiovascular problems
  • Women who are pregnant, perhaps as a result of hormonal changes and high amounts of growth factors.
  • Those who have the human papillomavirus (HPV) in any form
    individuals who are sex-steroid imbalanced.
  • Those who have relatives who frequently develop skin tags.

How can a skin tag be recognised?

Areas where skin tags frequently appear

  • The best way to identify a skin tag is by its peduncle. Skin tags hang off the skin by this tiny stalk, unlike moles and other skin growths.
  • Skin tags often have a length of less than 2 millimetres. Some have a growth potential of several centimetres.
  • The touch is mild on skin tags.
  • They can be smooth and round or wrinkled and irregular.
  • Some skin tags resemble rice grains and are threadlike.
  • Skin tags could have a flesh tone. Additionally, due to pigmentation or the lack of blood flow, twisted skin tags may become darker than the surrounding skin.

The following body parts frequently exhibit skin tags:

  • Armpits
  • Inner thighs
  • Buttock folds
  • Groin area
  • Under the b-reast
  • Genitals
  • Eyelids
  • Inner thighs
  • Neck

Who has a higher risk of getting skin tags?

Skin tags seem to be more common in:

  • Extremely fatty and obese individuals.
  • Those who suffer from diabetes and cardiovascular problems
  • Women who are pregnant, perhaps as a result of hormonal changes and high amounts of growth factors.
  • Those who have the human papillomavirus (HPV) in any form
    individuals who are sex-steroid imbalanced.
  • Those who have relatives who frequently develop skin tags.

 

Diagnosis

Testing is not necessary to confirm a skin tag diagnosis. A sample (biopsy) may be obtained and sent to a lab for analysis if the doctor has another suspicion.

Treatments for removing skin tags

Skin tags may come out on their own and remain affixed to the skin. An individual can decide to get a skin tag removed if it bothers them. Visit Twacha and speak with the knowledgeable dermatosurgeons for skin tag treatment.

The following are the basic suggestions for how to have it taken out:

  • Surgical procedure to remove
    During this surgical treatment, the skin tag is cut out with a scalpel or a pair of scissors. The outcomes are evident right away.
  • Cryotherapy
    Liquid nitrogen is used in this treatment to freeze the skin tag, which causes it to finally come off.
  • Electrosurgery
    The skin tag is burned during this process using high-frequency electrical radiation. The outcomes are evident right away.
  • Ligation
    By tying the skin tag with surgical thread to stop the blood flow, the skin tag is removed during this surgery.

What to observe following skin tag removal?

Skin tags may come out on their own and remain affixed to the skin. An individual can decide to get a skin tag removed if it bothers them. Visit Twacha and speak with the knowledgeable dermatosurgeons for skin tag treatment.

Hidden information regarding skin tags

Why would an individual choose to have a skin tag removed?

  • Skin tumours are safe.
  • A skin tag may also be referred to as a soft fibroma, cutaneous papilloma, acrochordon, or fibroepithelial polyp. These are the names in medicine.
  • They typically appear in the skin’s folds or crevasses.
  • Although they are completely safe, they are typically removed for aesthetic reasons.
  • They cause no pain.
  • Blood vessels and collagen, which are encased in an outer layer of skin, make up skin tags.
  • A person may have one to one hundred skin tags.
  • Skin tags are prone to appear on almost everyone at some point in their lives.
  • Skin tags are more prevalent in obese persons.
  • Skin cancer cannot develop from skin tags.

If one develops a skin tag, it’s feasible that it won’t be a problem. Skin tags, however, are a bother for the majority of people. If they don’t bother or bother the person, they can be ignored. However, keep in mind that if someone already has one skin tag, they could get more. Additionally, losing weight won’t assist persons with excess weight get rid of their skin tags.
Even though certain home cures may exist, it is advised to first see a dermatologist who can assist with the proper diagnosis and treatment. By using over-the-counter medications or home remedies, one runs the risk of making the issue worse. The primary factor driving people to choose skin tag removal is how it detracts from their appearance. There are no health issues related to it.

General advice for avoiding skin tags

Skin tags have no known source, making it challenging to stop them from developing. Only lowering the risk factors can be done. Consider the following actions:

  • A healthy weight can be sustained with regular activity and the ideal food habits.
  • Keeping up your general health might help you avoid diseases like diabetes, which can make you more likely to develop skin tags.
  • Wearing jewellery and outfits that can irritate your skin is best avoided.
  • Women who are expecting should keep up their health and cleanliness. In addition to speaking with their gynaecologist, visiting a dermatologist can be beneficial for selecting the best skincare products and receiving basic skincare advice to avoid skin issues related to pregnancy.
  • There is no preventive action in the case of genetic predisposition.

Various other skin growths that could resemble skin tags

Skin tags are frequently mistaken for moles, warts, seborrheic keratoses, and cancerous skin growths. While the precise distinction can only be made by a dermatologist following a comprehensive examination of the skin growth or following a biopsy, the fundamental distinction is as follows:

  • Moles – Moles are pink, tan, or brown in colour, unlike skin tags, which are often the same colour as the rest of the skin. Moles are typically flat, round, or oval in shape, though some might be elevated. Skin cancer can occasionally result from moles.
  • Warts – Skin tags and warts can both have the same hue. They do, however, appear to be rough. Warts are also brought on by a virus that can spread from person to person, in contrast to skin tags, the source of which is still unknown.Wearing jewellery and outfits that can irritate your skin is best avoided.
  • Scabrous keratosis – This type of skin growth is brown, black, or tan in colour and is slightly elevated. It seems waxy and can show up on the head, neck, chest, and back. Seborrheic Keratosis is totally attached to the surface skin, in contrast to skin tags, which are attached by a thin stalk. It has the appearance of being “pasted on.”
  • Cancerous skin growths – Skin tags and malignant skin growths are frequently mistaken for one another. Skin tags do not continue to expand, but malignant skin growths can. Skin tags are also similar to dead skin cells in that they lack feeling, although cancerous skin growths can be uncomfortable, ulcerous, and occasionally bleed.

Therefore, it is strongly advised to consult a dermatologist or dermatosurgeon in case of any form of skin growth in order to examine it, make an accurate diagnosis, and obtain prompt treatment.

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